Coastal Commission

State Senator Darrell Steinberg, in his role as Chairman of the Senate Rules Committee, requested that the Board of Supervisors submit the names of two Supervisors as possible members of the California Coastal Commission.

On Tuesday the Board approved the submission of my name and Supervisor Bill Campbell’s.

The cities in Orange County were also requested to submit two names.

This matter is discussed in today’s Long Beach Press-Telegram, which is the first article below, and the OC Register – Electronic, which is the second.

The two city nominees selected last evening by the League of Cities are Huntington Beach Mayor Keith Bohr and Laguna Beach Mayor Kelly Boyd.

Senator Steinberg FAXed me a long application to fill in yesterday and I’ve already received a questionnaire from someone representing a coalition of conservation organizations.  Here is a portion of their introduction:

More than 120 California coastal, statewide and national conservation organizations from San Diego to Del Norte are working together to provide recommendations to the Senate Rules Committee regarding this appointment.  We have made similar recommendations to the Rules Committee and the Speaker of the Assembly three times earlier this year, and we have been most pleased with their appointments.

This process should be an interesting one.  I have been to every county along the coast, numerous times, in my quest for photographing every California Historical Landmark.  So I know where Del Norte is.  Stay tuned.

TOP 103

The Daily Pilot released their annual Top 103 List today.  I’m still in the top 10.  In fact, I am number 10 this year.  With a new reporter at the Pilot, I was trying to explain that the growing public pension plan liabilities are finally coming to the fore, something I had been warning about for many, many years.  Consequently, I told her that I was proud of the passage of Measure J last November and how other municipalities are looking at it as a model to follow.  Unfortunately, the List is not on their website as of the sending of today’s Update so it is not included below. 

Shore Patrol: Another delay for wetlands land swap?

By Joe Segura, Staff Writer

Crowded field

County Supervisor Don Knabe’s nomination list of city officials for a vacated state Coastal Commission seat grew from five to eight.

Long Beach Councilwomen Gerrie Schipske and Suja Lowenthal are on the original list that will be submitted to the state Senate Rules Committee for selection.

Knabe’s original nomination list also included Rancho Palos Verdes Councilman Doug Stern, Rolling Hills Estates Mayor Judy Mitchell and Manhattan Beach Councilman Richard Montgomery.

Added to the list were Malibu City Councilman John Sibert, Santa Monica Mayor Pro Tem Pam O’Connor and Santa Monica Councilman Richard Bloom.

Orange County, part of the Coastal Commission’s South Coast district, has nominated John M.W. Moorlach and Bill Campbell, of the second and third districts, respectively.

Rancho Palos Verdes Councilman Larry Clark had been South Coast representative, but he decided not to seek re-election to the council.

The selection process has traditionally sparked heavy lobbying by both environmental groups and developers.

joe.segura@presstelegram.com, 562-499-1274

O.C. mayors vie for Coastal Commission spot

Annie Burris

Two Orange County mayors and two council members are vying for a spot on the California Coastal Commission – the state agency that decides land and water use issues related to California’s 1,100 miles of coast.

A county committee is slated to nominate at least two people tonight to serve on the commission. These names will be forwarded to the state Senate Rules Committee, which will make a final decision.

Applicants include Huntington Beach Mayor Keith Bohr, Seal Beach Mayor Gordon Shanks, Newport Beach Councilwoman Nancy Gardner and Laguna Beach Councilwoman Verna Rollinger.

The Senate committee is seeking to fill the seat of Rancho Palos Verdes Mayor Larry Clark, who is the representative for the commission’s South Coast region and was termed out this year.

The county committee’s candidates will compete with Los Angeles County nominees and other Orange County nominees Supervisors Bill Campbell and John Moorlach.

Previous Orange County officials to serve as the South Coast region representative include Shirley Dettloff of Huntington Beach, Linda Moulton-Patterson of Huntington Beach, and Toni Iseman of Laguna Beach.

Gardner said she has worked on coastal issues for 20 years and helped start a local Surfrider Foundation chapter. She said she had an eye-opening experience about a year ago when she had difficulty finding a beach with public access in Maryland.

“For the first time it came home to me,” Gardner said. “We are so lucky in California to have the Coastal Act, which has protected so much of our coast.”

Gardner also said that acting as an elected official gives her perspective on property owner issues.

Bohr said he has testified for the city of Huntington Beach before the Coastal Commission in the past. Bohr is a developer and has worked for the city’s Community Development Department for about eight years.

“I grew up in Illinois so the ocean is still a big deal,” he said. “This is the end of the continental 48 states and that is so cool.”

Shanks said he applied about a month ago.

“At the time no one else was running,” he said. “Now that it is filling up I don’t consider my changes at all high.”

Shanks said the senate committee will probably prefer a Democratic candidate and he is a Republican.

Rollinger was not immediately available for comment.

The city selection committee will meet at 5 p.m. at the Hilton Hotel, 3050 Bristol St. in Costa Mesa. Information: 714-834-2206.

INVITATION – SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28 – LIMITED CAPACITY

Our Fairview Park and Tustin Blimp Hangar outings were a blast.  Our next outing is on the Saturday after Thanksgiving.  We’re taking a morning hike.

The hike date and description are now up on the Irvine Ranch Conservancy website to view. 

Saturday, November 28th at 9:00 a.m. for 3 hours. 

We’ll hike 6 miles round trip from Limestone Canyon to Dripping Springs, with 475 feet of elevation change, and is described as a nice, leisurely stroll.

Because this schedule is viewable by the general public, the hike currently shows as FULL, so that random people won’t try and sign up.  It’s not full. 

If you wish to sign up for the hike, please contact the Irvine Conservancy directly by phone and ask for Meghan Sherburn, at 714-508-4767, and give her your information.

They will enter your reservation into their computer.  This is how they do it with hikes that are open to select groups only. 

The website will then generate a confirmation to you by email that will allow you to verify your information and be reminded of the hike.  It will also generate an e-mail if our hike needs to be cancelled due to weather conditions (Santa Ana winds or rain).

It will also pre-print the liability waiver, with all the names on it, so on the morning of the hike all you have to do is sign it and we’re off!  

As soon as we hit our capacity we may have to close registration.  Consequently, only register if you are really going to join us.

The web address for the description of the hike is:  http://www.irvineranchwildlands.org/activities/index.asp?col=&srt=&area=&pn=6&month=11&year=2009.

Mike O’Connell, Executive Director of the Irvine Ranch Conservancy will be leading our group. 

 

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Michael O’Connell
Executive Director
Irvine Ranch Conservancy
moconnell@irconservancy.org
Phone 714.508.4750 • Fax 714.508.4770
4727 Portola Parkway • Irvine, CA • 92620-1914

FIVE-YEAR LOOK BACKS

November 13

2004

The Daily Pilot’s Deirdre Newman covered “City takes line on going underground—Council wants to poll residents about taxes to pay for burying utility cables and beautifying the city.”  This would require an assessment district for property owners that were impacted.  Consequently, since this will show up on your property tax bill, I was given a call.

It’s an option worth exploring, said John Moorlach, the county treasurer and a Costa Mesa resident.

“If you look at our neighboring cities and you look at how nice they are—the new developments—everything is underground,” Moorlach said.  “You drive around Costa Mesa and it kills you to see all these overhead lines.  From a standpoint of beautifying the city, it’s something that needs to be explored.”

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